Fashion Designer XingYuan Xu debuts her collection in "Recluse" for the "Color Issue"

 
 

Starting at a young age, fashion designer Xingyuan Xu found her love for the arts in a way that not every adolescent dreams up. “I was addicted to drawing group portraits of beautiful women when I was little. The way I dressed up each of them differently and didn’t even allow one detail similarity in collar or hemline made me realize that I wanted to be a designer” says Xingyuan.

Born in Nanjing, a city in Southern China known for its historical and cultural background, many of Xingyuan's collections are reflections of the designers childhood memories, her experience with cultural differences, as well as her inner conflict between illusion and reality.

The idea of “being unique” has followed Xianyuan in every step she has taken in her career. “I want people to feel that they are concealed securely by my garments, not only through the over-size and the weight, but also through the construction details and pockets that are intentionally hidden by colors and textiles. My garments are unique, but not too loud to disturb others. This offers an opportunity for those who live in the city but have always wanted to escape from the rules and constraints as they will be satisfied by releasing themselves in my seemly craziness.”

Inspired by a group of concealed Chinese hermits avoiding the noise and perils of life, Xianyuan's current collection combines her visual preference of seeing 2-dimensionally with her understanding of the Chinese spirit of “concealing”. “The complicated lines and layers, the arrangement of colors, as well as the variation of textiles are all concealing my entangled personality”, she says.

When it comes to the future Xingyuan says “My aim of becoming a fashion designer was to bring to the world a new Chinese style which would be different from what has been called or seen as Orientalism. In the future I will continue developing the idea of concealing the Chinese spirits into textiles, constructions, the pattern-making process, as well as arrangements of colors, instead of visually borrowing any elements from the Chinese culture.”

“I want people to feel that they are concealed securely by my garments.”
— Xingyuan Xu
 
 

Photographer Dalong Yang
Styling Xingyuan Xu
Makeup Makeup Pro New York                                                                                                  

Hair Ken See
Model Qiwen
Assistant Nana Zhang