Aaron Porter in 'Cruising in Dystopia' by joel palmer




RISK MAGAZINE: How can we embrace our bodies and our own sexuality without the stigmas associated

with them?


Aaron Porter: I think alleviating ourselves from stigmas will be a lifelong challenge, but the exploration of

our sexuality is essential. Stigmas are not going anywhere, people will always judge, but this is our life, our

bodies and we decide how we use them. Only by embracing ourselves in our truest forms will we reach a

higher frequency and understanding of what it really means to live.




RISK MAGAZINE: Do you see your body as art? Have you always seen it that way? What work did it take

to see that?


Aaron Porter: Absolutely – it has definitely not always been that way though. I can remember a time in

which I would try to hide my body/my curves. My shape was not the same as all the white kids or even the

boys/men I had ever seen. I started dance training later in life when it became viable for me & through

learning to move and doing choreography etc. the body does become art, but even in dance training I

would be attacked for the dominance of my ass – my teachers treated my body as if I was caucasian,

which obviously didn’t work.


"We as black people have gained the opportunity to call outracism when we see it without being able to receive a completely negative reply. The Black Lives Matter movement really has opened a lot of eyes (not all), and has meant the conversation is easier to bring up without the regular “you're just being sensitive” reply."



RISK MAGAZINE: What does self love and self celebration look like for you?


Aaron Porter: It looks like music, friendships or a sweaty rave! Often in a thong Ha!

 

RISK MAGAZINE: Have you noticed any recent shift in the way Black people have reclaimed their bodies

and their sexuality from a dominant white gaze? aka - have you noticed any recent shift in the way Black

people have taken ownership of their bodies separate from ... * the control of white people * ?

Aaron Porter: I really have noticed the change – we as black people have gained the opportunity to call out

racism when we see it without being able to receive a completely negative reply. The Black Lives Matter

movement really has opened a lot of eyes (not all), and has meant the conversation is easier to bring up

without the regular “you're just being sensitive” reply. I have seen a lot less racial preferences on the apps

which has been great and the confidence within our community has risen!




RISK MAGAZINE: How does the desirability of masculinity affect the way you present yourself?

Aaron Porter: I wear a lot of female clothing and I am crazy confident in it, however I am aware most of the

community would not necessarily be into it. I try not to let that change how I dress though. I wouldn’t, for

example, go home and change before meeting someone. So they might catch me in a crop top, but If I’m

coming from my house I’d probably be in a tracksuit already so I wouldn’t have to worry. After meeting me I

think it’s clear I wouldn’t necessarily be put into a stereotypically “femme” box, not that I give a fuck either

way – I hate that we have these binaries that gays live by. Though I think it's getting better and people are

becoming a lot more open minded.






RISK MAGAZINE: How much does outside validation contribute to your overall self-esteem?


Aaron Porter: I have to admit I am a low-key dopamine addict – I do gain a sense of power when it comes

to online validation. I’m trying to remove myself from this though as I know it’s not healthy. I don’t feel too

bad admitting this as I think most of our generation feels the same way. Likes and comments are an easy

way to measure the popularity of a post and every time you get more attention than the last it drives the

want to better each post higher. I do not put things online just for audience gratification though, I do it

because I’m proud of what I’m posting and I want to share it. Until I get better at not giving a fuck about

online validation please feel free to help out by following me on @justaaronporter haha.




In a Risk Magazine series "Decolonizing Sexuality", Aaron Porter stars in 'Cruising in Dystopia' photographed by Joel Palmer, styled by Davide.


Model Aaron Porter

Photographer Joel Palmer

Styling Davide

Lighting & Post Jacob Sztor

Assistants Sacha Nicette, Nic Locke, Auryn Reeve

Interview LaQuann Dawson

Producer Jack Goldsmith


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